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Frederick Sommer

Frederick Sommer (1905-1999) “Situating his photography within a wider artistic practice that included poetry, drawing and painting, Sommer pushed the boundaries of photography’s subject matter. He moved from finding things to photograph to creating things for the camera, a method that has great resonance with contemporary photography.”

http://atypicalart.com/nonsense/frederick_sommer/

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/f/frederick-sommer-exhibition/

Frederick Sommer

Frederick Sommer (1905-1999) “Situating his photography within a wider artistic practice that included poetry, drawing and painting, Sommer pushed the boundaries of photography’s subject matter. He moved from finding things to photograph to creating things for the camera, a method that has great resonance with contemporary photography.”

http://atypicalart.com/nonsense/frederick_sommer/

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/f/frederick-sommer-exhibition/

Filed under frederick sommer photography visual poetry surreal photography staged photography

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Clarence John Laughlin (1905 -1985). Self taught in photography his work was influenced among others by Eugene Atget who tried to capture a decaying urban landscape.  Laughlin’s home city of New Orleans was the location for many of his pictures. Seen as the first surrealist photographer in the United States he “constructed elaborate stages and employed models, costumes, and props to create haunting abstractions”.  His book, “Ghosts Along the Mississippi,” was published in 1948.   

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/exhibit_display.asp?ArtistID=13&ExhibitID=109

Clarence John Laughlin (1905 -1985). Self taught in photography his work was influenced among others by Eugene Atget who tried to capture a decaying urban landscape. Laughlin’s home city of New Orleans was the location for many of his pictures. Seen as the first surrealist photographer in the United States he “constructed elaborate stages and employed models, costumes, and props to create haunting abstractions”. His book, “Ghosts Along the Mississippi,” was published in 1948.

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/exhibit_display.asp?ArtistID=13&ExhibitID=109

Filed under clarence john laughlin photography staged photography dreamworld new orleans surrealism surrealist photography

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"Stacey Rozich is a Seattle-based artist and illustrator. Her work draws inspiration from a broad spectrum of cultural references, building scenarios pulled from a realm steeped in indigenous and contemporary symbolism. Rozich creates a parable for present day built on situational vignettes that are imagined through the lens of familiar fictional archetypes.
Deeply rooted in cultural tradition and ritual, these allegorical accounts join ancestral folklore with elements of modernity and surrealism. Influence is taken from travel, world textiles, childhood memories and television.”

http://staceyrozich.com

Filed under stacey rozich illustration illustrator fictional archetypes vignettes folklore surrealism

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Laurie Lipton

“I grew up in the clean & cozy suburbs of New York in the 1950’s and 60’s. Everything was perfect. Everyone was perfect. I was a perfectly lovely, cute little girl. What the hell was I supposed to do with the swirling mass of anti-Disney feeling careening in my guts? How was I supposed to cope with fear and rage and all the other negative human emotions? If I hadn’t found a way of letting out the horror, it would have consumed me from the inside out.”

www.laurielipton.com

www.strychnin.com/Press.html?file=tl_files/Files/_pdf_press/oldsite02/150-201/184.pdf

Filed under laurie Lipton illustration gothic

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hifructosemag:

Ray Caesar has a solo show of new works at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome on February 14 and a retrospective in Turin, Italy opening on February 15. Read more about his new body of work, “The Trouble with Angels,” on Hi-Fructose. All images courtesy of Ray Caesar/Gallery House.

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'That Old Black and White Magic' Carol Golemboski

"The photographs in this series relate analog photography to the golden age of magic. In these images the photographer is the conjurer, a performer who creates tricks behind the curtain of the darkroom. Objects are often suspended, fooling the eye, but the illusions occur more frequently in the printing process, where photography is combined with drawing and photograms."

www.carolgolemboski.com

Filed under carol golemboski photography analog black and white still life